Skip to main content

Welcome to the Ministry of

Climate Resilience, The Environment, Forestry, Fisheries & Disaster Management

About Fisheries

About Fisheries

Fisheries Banner

 

Administration of Fisheries in Grenada

The Grenadian Fisheries Department, a unit of the Ministry of Climate Resilience, the Environment, Forestry, Fisheries, Disaster Management & Information, oversees the fishing sector. An organogram of the Department is attached.

The authority charged with management and development of fisheries in Grenada is the Fisheries Division which is headed by a Chief Fisheries Officer. 

The Division has thirteen technical/operational staff, namely the Chief Fisheries Officer, one Assistant Biologist, three District Extension Officers, one officer responsible for coordination of the Marine Protected Areas Programme, two Data Entry Clerks, and two Refrigeration Technicians. Support staff includes one Secretary and two Clerical Trainees.

There is severe staff shortage in critical areas such as fisheries biology, extension methodology, and data management. There are also thirty-three staff members based at seven District Fisheries Centres in Grenada, and four in Carriacou.

Governance agencies/major stakeholders include Grenada Coast Guard and district police, Customs Department, Physical Planning Unit/Land Development Control Authority, Grenada Board of Tourism, Environmental Health Division of the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Finance (Planning and Development), Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Grenada Ports Authority, Forestry Division, Grenada Bureau of Standards, and Produce Chemist Laboratory.

Fisheries Governance is entrusted to a Fisheries Division (Fisheries Management Unit) as lead agency which is responsible for management and development within the sector.

The Division comes under the Ministry of Climate Resilience, the Environment, Forestry, Fisheries, Disaster Management and Information, and authority for execution of management functions is derived from legislation enacted since 1986 and 1987, with subsequent amendments as appropriate.

Non-governmental agencies include user group stakeholders such as Grenada Hotel and Tourism Association, Grenada Divers Association, Fishers Cooperatives and Associations, and Eco- tourism providers such as dive operators.

One of the most important international agreements influencing fisheries management is the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) of 1982 (and its protocols). The UNCLOS process generated two pieces of legislation in 1988: the Territorial Waters Act, and the Marine Boundaries Act, later consolidated and updated into the Grenada Territorial Sea and Marine boundaries Act #25 of 1989. Earlier in 1986, the parent legislation, the Grenada Fisheries Act #15 was passed and regulations SRO #9, 1987, became part of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) Harmonized Laws.

Services, Fishing Technology / Safety at Sea, Data Management, Marine Protected Areas Management, Resource Assessment and Management, among others. Government facilitates management and development of the sector by maintaining onshore support infrastructure facilities for marketing of fish, such as, cold storage, ice making, marine safety communication and provision of general service to fishing communities. 

The Fisheries Division also maintains close collaboration with Coast Guard, Customs, Ports Authority and other relevant agencies for enforcement of laws and regulations, while fishermen’s organisations are engaged in ongoing consultations on fisheries management issues.  Eight fish market centres are strategically located around the islands to deliver various services, but fish is also landed at thirty-seven other landing sites. These are categorized as primary (with market and port facilities), secondary (beaches/bays without infrastructure), and tertiary (Processing Plants). 

The fishing sub-sector is predominantly small-scale commercial. As a result of opportunities in the oceanic pelagic fishery, the policy within the past ten to fifteen years has been to expand production from this fishery by facilitating the upgrade of capacity of the fleet. Accordingly, there is an increasing number and size of vessels ranging between 32 – 55 feet [9.8 – 16.8 metres] fishing up to fourteen (14) days per trip. The other category of vessels is between 16 - 30 feet [4.9 – 9.1 metres] which are day-boats. The remainder of the fleet consists of a few vessels less than 16 feet [4.9 metres] and primarily operate on a subsistence basis.

 

 

Melville Street Fish Market

Melville Street Fish Market

 

 

Vessels Anchored at Melville Street Fish Market Jetty

Vessels Anchored at Melville Street Fish Market Jetty

 

 

Gouyave Fish Market Complex

Gouyave Fish Market Complex

 

 

Grenville Fish Market

Grenville Fish Market

Organizational Structure of Fisheries Management

  • Cabinet of Ministers
  • Minister of Fisheries
  • Permanent Secretary
  • Chief Fisheries Officer

Units within the Fisheries Division:

  • Planning, Coordination and Management
  • District Extension Services
  • District Fish Market Centres
  • Fishing Technology / Safety at Sea
  • Fisheries Biology
  • Marine Protected Areas
  • Refrigeration Technicians
Fisheries Organization Chart

More About Us

Grenada, a tri-island State which consists of mainland Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique, harvests mainly a multi-specie marine capture fishery that is conducted under open access conditions. The fishery is artisanal and small-scale in nature, and in recent years the sector has been developing form subsistence to commercial operations in order to increase earnings and employment, contribute to food security and assist in reducing poverty. A major area of growth has been in the oceanic pelagic fishery that involves targeting of yellowfin tuna mainly for exports. Previously, this fishery was targeted by day-boats up to 30 feet, using outboard gas motors, and carried no ice. But within the past ten years there has been significant improvement in technology resulting in the use of larger ice-boats up to fifty feet, and outfitted with diesel inboard motors providing the capacity to undertake multi-day fishing trips.

This has been the fastest growing fishery for the past fifteen years and accounts for 71% of total annual fish catch. Species caught are yellow fin tuna, billfishes, dolphin fish etc. Yellow fin tuna, which is mainly targeted for export comprises 28% of total annual fish catch. This fishery is harvested by seventy (70) multi-day vessels and two hundred and seventy (270) open day-boats using surface longline on the west coast of the Island. Other species such as wahoo, small tunas, dolphin fish, king mackerel etc. are targeted by one hundred and forty (140) day-boats, 18-24 feet [5.2 – 7.3 metres] using troll lines primarily along the east coast.

The island shelf of Grenada and its dependencies provide a favourable habitat for a consistent harvest of various deep slope species of groupers, hinds, snappers and a range of tropical shallow coral reef fin-fish which is predominantly harvested by one hundred and thirty (130) open vessels under 18 feet (5.5 metres) using handline, bottom longline, and pots. This fishery contributes 22% of total annual fish catch with harvesting carried out primarily to the north, south, south-east and north-east coasts of mainland Grenada and the Grenada Grenadines – Carriacou and Petite Martinique. Other vessels in the oceanic pelagic fishery also harvest this fishery opportunistically especially during periods of decreased abundance of the oceanic pelagic species.

An essentially important food fishery which supports several coastal and rural communities also provides bait for other fisheries – oceanic pelagic and demersal. Species such as bigeye scads, rainbow runners, round scads and other carangids, and small tunas, are harvested in shallow bays principally along the leeward coastline. The fishery contributes 6% to total annual fish catch and is harvested by fifty (50) open vessels with a size range of 24 – 28 feet [7.3 – 8.5 metres].

A high value fishery, which consists of Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), Queen conch (Strombus gigas) and sea turtles, and contributes 3% of total fish catch are targeted by one hundred (100) open vessels with a size range of 16 – 24 feet [4.9 – 7.3 metres]. Fishing grounds are located on the north, north-east, south and southeast coasts. Other unrelated species such as Seamoss (Gracilaria Spp), are mainly found to the south and south-east of the mainland and are harvested by similar vessels.

 

 

Waltham Fish Market

Waltham Fish Market

 

 

Duquesne Fish Market

Duquesne Fish Market

There are 10 Objectives of Fisheries Management outlined below-

  1. Develop and increase the potential of marine living resources to meet human nutritional needs, as well as social, economic, and development goals, especially to contribute to foreign exchange earnings.
  2. Ensure that the fishing industry is integrated into the policy and decision-making process concerning fisheries and coastal zone management.
  3. Take into account traditional knowledge and interests of local communities, small-scale artisanal fisheries and indigenous people in development and management programs.
  4. Maintain or restore populations of marine species at levels that can produce the maximum sustainable yield as qualified by relevant environmental and economic factors, taking into consideration relationships among species
  5. Promote the development and use of selective fishing gear and practices that minimize waste in the catch of target species and minimize by-catch of non-target species.
  6. Ensure effective monitoring and enforcement with respect to fishing activities (especially foreign fishing).
  7. Protect and restore endangered marine species.
  8. Preserve rare or fragile ecosystems, as well as habitats and other ecologically sensitive areas, especially coral reef ecosystems, estuaries, mangroves, seagrass beds, and other spawning and nursery areas.
  9. Promote scientific research with respect to fisheries resources.
  10. Cooperate with other nations in the management of shared or highly migratory stocks of commercial importance to Grenada.

 

 

Victoria Fish Market

Victoria Fish Market

 

 

 

 

Sauteurs Fish Market

Sauteurs Fish Market

 

 

Landing Site

There are forty-five (45) fish landing sites around the islands. Eight, are primary landing sites with fish market and port facilities (Grenville, Melville Street, Gouyave, Victoria, Waltham, Duquesne, Sauteurs and Hillsborough in Carriacou); thirty-seven, are secondary landing sites (beaches/bays without infrastructure) and one tertiary landing site at Grand Mal where two of the four fish processing plants are located.

An annual sport fishing competition known as the Spice-isle Billfish Tournament is held for three days during January which attracts a minimum of thirty foreign vessels in addition to the local fleet. In recent years the rules of the competition dictates that it operates exclusively a catch and release tournament, therefore data is not obtained from this activity.

As there are an increasing number of vessels involved in this fishery, the policy is to arrange for the registration and licensing of vessels in order to regulate their operation.

FISHERS REGISTERED BY HOME PORT BY ISLAND BY COAST

HOME PORT

ISLAND

COAST

BOATS

Carenage

Grenada

St. George's Town

 

Grenada Yacht Club

Grenada

St. George's Town

 

Lagoon Road

Grenada

St. George's Town

 

Melville Street

Grenada

St. George's Town

 

St. George's

Grenada

St. George's Town

 

Beausejour

Grenada

West coast

 

Brizan

Grenada

West coast

 

Cherry Hill

Grenada

West coast

 

Dragon Bay

Grenada

West coast

 

Fontenoy

Grenada

West coast

 

Gouyave

Grenada

West coast

 

Grand Anse

Grenada

West coast

 

Grand Mal

Grenada

West coast

 

Mollinerre

Grenada

West coast

 

Calivigny

Grenada

South coast

 

Lance Aux Epine

Grenada

South coast

 

Belmont

Grenada

South coast

 

Calliste

Grenada

South coast

 

Clarkes Court Bay (Woburn)

Grenada

South coast

 

Island View Bay

Grenada

South coast

 

Morne Rouge

Grenada

South coast

 

Mt.Pandy (Beach)

Grenada

South coast

 

Mt.Pandy (Belmont)

Grenada

South coast

 

Prickley Bay

Grenada

South coast

 

Southern Southern Coast

Grenada

South coast

 

True Blue

Grenada

South coast

 

Woburn

Grenada

South coast

 

Corinth

Grenada

East coast

 

Fort Jeudy

Grenada

East coast

 

Grenville

Grenada

East coast

 

Westerhall

Grenada

East coast

 

 

Grenada

Unknown

 

Grenadian law should require both boats and fishers to be registered and licensed, even just to be able to keep track spatially of the numbers of them active in the fishery. Licensing and registration of fishers and fishing vessels is a standard and globally- used fisheries management tool, which has not been employed in Grenada.

Having accurate and up-to-date information on where fishers are spatially distributed in Grenada will guide those who would plan for the involvement of fishers, fisher organizations, fishing communities and other stakeholders in the management of fishery resources. The density of fishers in certain locations will guide where fishers’ organizations should be encouraged to form.

In addition, it is only right for fishers to make an annual contribution towards the cost of management to produce healthy fish stocks from which they earn their livelihoods. (The above section starting with “when” is misconstrued since the fisheries Legislation provides for registration of fishers and vessels; and also licensing of vessels. However, the lack of adequate financial and human resources is seriously impeding ongoing updating of both registries.

 Number of Registered Fishers and Boats by Parish

LOCATION

BOATS

FISHERS

St. George

693

 

St. John

321

 

St Mark

149

 

St Patrick

111

 

Isle De Ronde

4

 

St. Andrew

366

 

St. David

70

 

Carriacou 

279

 

Petite Martinique

129

 

TOTAL

2122

 

 

 

Open Pirogue with Ice Box

Open Pirogue with Ice Box

 

 

Pirogue with Cabin

Pirogue with Cabin

 

 

Commercial Tuna Longliner

Commercial Tuna Longliner

 

 

Beach Seine Vessel

Beach Seine Vessel

 

 

Fishing Inspection

Fishing Inspection

 

 

Fishing Inspection

Fishing Inspection

 

 

Fishing Inspection

Fishing Inspection

 

 

Fishing Inspection

Fishing Inspection

 

 

Fishing Inspection

Fishing Inspection

Stakeholder Organizations/FFOs

There are nine (9) functional fishermen’s organizations in Grenada: seven (7) on the mainland, one (1) on Carriacou, and one (1) on Petit Martinique; one of the mainland organizations is now defunct as it has been replaced by a co-operative:

FISHERS’ ORGANIZATIONS, LOCATIONS AND MEMBERS

 

Name of Organization

Location

Approx. Members

1

Gouyave Fishermen Cooperative Society Ltd

Gouyave

90

2

Southern Fishermen Association (SFA)

Grand Mal

 

3

Sauteurs Fishermen Cooperative (SFC1)

Sauteurs

 

4

Melville Street Fishermen Group (MSFG)

St. George’s

 

5

Grenville Fishermen Association (GFA)1

Grenville

 

6

Soubies Fishermen Cooperative (SFC2)

Grenville

 

7

Calliste Fishermen Cooperative (CFC1)

Calliste

 

8

Carriacou Fishermen Cooperative (CFC2)

Carriacou

 

9

Petite Martinique Fishermen Cooperative

Petite Martinique

 

10

St. Mark Fishermen Cooperative

St. Mark

 

11

Grenville FAD Fishers Association

Grenville

 

TOTAL MEMBERS

 

 

 

Fishermans Birthday Celebrations

Fishermans Birthday Celebrations

 

 

Fishermans Birthday Celebrations

Fishermans Birthday Celebrations